Saturday, 27 August 2016

Roomba Now Able to Hunt Arnold Schwarzenegger

Ever since the Roomba was invented, humanity has been one step closer to a Jetsons-style future with robots performing all of our tedious tasks for us. The platform is so ubiquitous and popular with the hardware hacking community that almost anything that could be put on a Roomba has been done already, with one major exception: a Roomba with heat vision. Thanks to [marcelvarallo], though, there’s now a Roomba with almost all of the capabilities of the Predator.

The Roomba isn’t just sporting an infrared camera, though. This Roomba comes fully equipped with a Raspberry Pi for wireless connectivity, audio in and out, video streaming from a webcam (and the FLiR infrared camera), and control over the motors. Everything is wired to the internal battery which allows for automatic recharging, but the impressive part of this build is that it’s all done in a non-destructive way so that the Roomba can be reverted back to a normal vacuum cleaner if the need arises.

If sweeping a just the right time the heat camera might be the key to the messy problem we discussed on Wednesday.

The only thing stopping this from hunting humans is the addition of some sort of weapons. Perhaps this sentry gun or maybe some exploding rope. And, if you don’t want your vacuum cleaner to turn into a weapon of mass destruction, maybe you could just turn yours into a DJ.


Filed under: robots hacks

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Kinect and Raspberry Pi Add Focus Pulling to DSLR

Prosumer DSLRs have been a boon to the democratization of digital media. Gear that once commanded professional prices is now available to those on more modest budgets. Not only has this unleashed a torrent of online content, it has also started a wave of camera hacks and accessories, like this automatic focus puller based on a Kinect and a Raspberry Pi.

For [Tom Piessens], the Canon EOS 5D has been a solid platform but suffers from a problem. The narrow depth of field possible with DSLRs makes it difficult to maintain focus on subjects that are moving relative to the camera, making follow-focus scenes like this classic hard to reproduce. Aiming for a better system than the stock autofocus, [Tom] grafted a Kinect sensor and a stepper motor actuator to a Raspberry Pi, and used the Kinect’s depth map to drive the focus ring. Parts are laser-cut, including a nice enclosure for the Pi and display that makes the whole thing reasonably portable. The video below shows the focus remaining locked on a selected region of interest. It seems like movement along only one axis is allowed; we’d love to see this system expanded to follow a designated object no matter where it moves in the frame.

If you’re in need of a follow-focus rig but don’t have a geared lens, check out these 3D-printed lens gears. They’d be a great complement to this backwoods focus-puller.


Filed under: digital cameras hacks, Raspberry Pi

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Friday, 26 August 2016

Share what makes Linux amazing; win an actual penguin*

Poppy the Penguin

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Linux, Future Cert, the UK and Ireland’s representative for the LPI (Linux Professional Institute) is asking everyone to share what they think are the ‘most amazing uses for Linux’ to compile a public list.

Every entry will go into a prize draw with the winner receiving a year’s adoption of Poppy the Penguin at Bristol Zoo (your own Linux mascot, just like Tux!).

Bill Quinn, founder of Future Cert, said: “We wanted to do something fun to coincide with the 25th celebrations happening over the next few months and this is a really great way of celebrating the many uses for Linux. But we’ll be really interested to hear users views on great Linux uses around the world – there are so many.

“And of course some will remember the urban legend from 18 years ago about Tux the penguin breaking free from Bristol Zoo and waddling off to a computer store.”

It is true that when Linus Torvalds visited the Bristol Linux Users Group they adopted a Penguin for him at Bristol Zoo. Of course, the subsequent ‘news’ articles that went around after were not quite so true – but they were a lot of fun! You can read about the escape – and the Penguin stamping violently on a Windows 98 box here.

The ‘amazing uses’ could be anything from a particular supercomputer, to a small home gadget. See Future Cert’s list of ’25 amazing uses for Linux’ here.

You can enter via the Future Cert Twitter page @futurecert or Facebook page ‘futurecert’. Alternatively visit http://ift.tt/2bkkUGW

The closing date is September 30th 2016. The list will be compiled and revealed in October along with the winner.

*Poppy is an African Penguin at Bristol Zoo. The prize is adoption for one year, which includes an adoption pack in the post that will contain two tickets to the Zoo, a cuddly toy, an adoption certificate, your name displayed at the exhibit and a fact-file about Poppy the Penguin.

Image above, Poppy the Penguin with her two chicks, courtesy of Bristol Zoo.



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Monday, 22 August 2016

Multi Sensor Security Camera Has You Covered

Security in the home — especially a new home — is a primary concern for many. There are many options for security systems on the market, but for those will the skills, taking matters into your own hands can add peace of mind when protected by a system of one’s own design. [Armagan C.] has created  their near-ideal multi-sensor security module to keep a watchful eye out for would-be burglars.

Upgrading from their previous Arduino + Ethernet camera — which loved to trigger false alarms — [Armagan] opted for a used Raspberry Pi model B+ camera module and WiFi connection this time around. They also upgraded the unit with a thermal sensor, LPG & CO2 gas sensor, and a motion tracking alarm. [Armagan] has also set up a live streaming  feature that records video in 1hr segments — deleting them daily — and circumvented an issue with file descriptor leak by using a crashed drone’s flight controller to route the sensor data via serial port. It is also proving superior to conventional alarms because the custom software negates the need to disarm security zones during midnight trips to the washroom.

Admitting the thermal sensor doesn’t work very well at present, it might be replaced if a Doppler radar can be acquired on the cheap. More details on the project can be found here. This is primarily an indoor security camera option, so you’ll still need an outdoor camera to really tighten up your home’s defenses.

[Thanks for the tip Armagan!]


Filed under: Raspberry Pi, security hacks

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Hackaday Links: August 21, 2016

Are you in New York? What are you doing this week? Hackaday is having a party on Wednesday evening. come on out!

How about a pub in Cambridge? Hackaday and Tindie will be there too, on Wednesday evening. It’s a bring-a-hack, so bring a hack and enjoy the company of your fellow nerds. If this goes late enough we can have a trans-Atlantic Hackaday meetup.

Portable emulation machines are all the rage, and [Pierre] built one based on the Raspberry Pi Zero. It’s small, looks surprisingly comfortable to hold, and is apparently it’s fairly inexpensive to build your own.

For the last year or so, the Raspberry Pi Zero has existed. This came as a surprise to many who couldn’t buy a Raspberry Pi Zero. In other news, Ferraris don’t exist, and neither do Faberge egg omelets. Now, the Raspberry Pi shortage is officially over. They’re in stock everywhere, and we can finally stop listening to people who call the Pi Zero a marketing ploy.

No Starch Press is having another Humble Bundle. Pay what you want, and you get some coding books. They have Python, Haskell, and R, because no one should ever have to use SPSS.

[Reg] wrote in to tell us about something interesting he found while cruising eBay. The used and surplus market is awash in Siemens MC45/MC46 cellular modem modules. They’re a complete GSM ‘cellular modem engine’, with an AT command set, and cost about $10 each. Interfacing them with a board requires only two (strange) connectors, SIM and SD card sockets, and a few traces to through-hole pads. Anyone up for a challenge? A breakout board for this cellular modem could be very useful, should someone find a box full of these modules in a surplus shop.

On this page, about halfway down the page, is an LCD driver board. It turns a video signal into something a small, VGA resolution LCD will understand. This driver board is unique because it is completely hand-made. This is one of those small miracles of a soldering iron and copper clad board. If anyone out there is able to recognize these parts, I’d love for you to attempt an explanation in the comments.

A few weeks ago, the RTL8710 WiFi module showed up on the usual online marketplaces. Initially, we thought it was a competitor to the ever-popular ESP8266, offering a small microcontroller, WiFi, and a bunch of useful output pins. A module based on the RTL8710, the RTL-00, is much more than a competitor. It’s pinout compatible with the ESP8266. This module can be swapped into a project in place of the ESP-12, probably the most popular version of the ESP8266. This is genius, and opens the door to a lot of experimentation with the RTL8710.


Filed under: Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links

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Saturday, 20 August 2016

One Man, A Raspberry Pi, and a Formerly Hand Powered Loom

[Fred Hoefler] was challenged to finally do something with that Raspberry Pi he wouldn’t keep quiet about. So he built a machine assist loom for the hand weaver. Many older weavers simply can’t enjoy their art anymore due to the physical strain caused by the repetitive task. Since he had a Pi looking for a purpose, he also had his project.

His biggest requirement was cost. There are lots of assistive looms on the market, but the starting price for those is around ten thousand dollars. So he set the rule that nothing on the device would cost more than the mentioned single board computer. This resulted in a BOM cost for the conversion that came in well under two hundred dollars. Not bad!

The motive parts are simple cheap 12V geared motors off Amazon. He powered them using his own motor driver circuits. They get their commands from the Pi, running Python. To control the loom one can either type in commands into the shell or use the keyboard. There are also some manual switches on the loom itself.

In the end [Fred] met his design goal, and has further convinced his friends that the words Raspberry Pi are somehow involved with trouble.


Filed under: Raspberry Pi, robots hacks

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Hackaday Prize Entry: A Raspberry Pi Password Manager

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